Faith Doesn’t Give Up!

Luke 18 is an amazing chapter. It begins with Jesus sharing a parable to teach his disciples to “pray and not give up” (Luke 18:1) and ends with a real-life story of someone doing just that.

The blind beggar whose story Luke recounts in the closing verses of the chapter called out to Jesus for mercy. The more those around him tried to quiet him, the more he persisted in pleading until, ultimately, Jesus acknowledged him and answered his prayer.

It’s a common question: Why does God, who knows what we need before we ask (Matthew 6:8), ask us to persevere in prayer? We can see part of the answer in Jesus’ response to the blind beggar: “Your faith has healed you” (Luke 18:42). What Jesus is pointing out is that the blind man, by continuing to call even after he was rebuked and told to be quiet, was demonstrating not only persistence but, more importantly, faith as well. God wants us to persist in prayer because persisting requires faith – “and without faith, it is impossible to please God” (Hebrews 11:6).

Let’s be honest: Prayer is easy, but persistence is not. It’s not easy to stay faithful in prayer when we’re not seeing any progress, or when things seem only to be getting worse. At those times, everything around us seems to be shouting, as the crowd did to the blind beggar, to dissuade us from praying. If we’re trusting God for a healing, the aches and pains in our bodies scream at us to be quiet and not trouble him anymore. If we’re looking for wisdom or direction, our friends or family may rebuke us for putting our trust in an unseen God instead of listening to the experts around us. And if we need some kind of major breakthrough, it may be our own doubts and fears that try to convince us that the need is too big to pray for; something too far out of reach.

It’s striking that Jesus uses the example of an unjust judge to illustrate our need to be persistent. His point is clear: If persistence is rewarded even by an unjust judge, how much more will it rewarded by the righteous God who loves us? But Jesus’ question at the end of the parable gets to the crux of the matter: “When the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” (Luke 18:8)

God makes us persist because, as much as he’s concerned about our earthly needs, he recognizes that our need for faith is greater. It’s not easy to hold on to God’s promises when we’re going through hard times, but the faith that we build in those times is worth it.

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials. These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed. (I Peter 1:6,7)

Jesus Christ will be revealed in our circumstances.  Let’s keep the faith while we wait!

Otis A. Fortenberry